Home > Ancient > Roman Imperial/Frontier Wars > Trajan's Column

Among the grandeur of the ruins of ancient Rome stands Trajan’s Column. It was dedicated in 113 CE to honor Emperor Trajan. The column rises to over 100 feet high and originally was topped by a statue of Trajan himself. (Today a statue of St. Peter rises from the top). The column is covered in a spiraling sequence of carved sculptures, which appear to depict Trajan’s two successful wars against the Dacians.
To view photos of the sculptured panels that wind up the sides of the memorial and additional information visit: Trajan’s Column

Only the first several bands are visible from the ground. While the sculptures have been eroding, plaster casts taken in the 1860s reside in the Roman EUR museum and allow for detailed study. The column sits on a massive base that once held Trajan’s ashes. There is a spiral staircase carved within the column that leads to an observation platform; this staircase is not open to the public, but the website author did have the opportunity to walk up to the top.

Rome_Seminar_Day_3_026.jpg
Rome_Seminar_Day_3_028.jpg
Rome_Seminar_Day_3_029.jpg
Rome_Seminar_Day_3_032.jpg
Rome_Seminar_Day_3_038.jpg
Rome_Seminar_Day_3_045.jpg
Rome_Seminar_Day_3_058.jpg
Rome_Seminar_Day_3_070.jpg
Rome_Seminar_Day_3_086.jpg
Rome_Seminar_Day_3_082.jpg
Rome_Seminar_Day_5_007.jpg
Rome_Seminar_Day_5_008.jpg
Rome_Seminar_Day_5_009.jpg
Rome_Seminar_Day_5_010.jpg
Rome_Seminar_Day_5_011.jpg
Rome_Seminar_Day_5_012.jpg
39 files on 3 page(s) 1